Classes

April 9, 2012

Events and Workshops

Those who take the workshops are assured a supportive environment, providing a better understanding of the pleasure of the creative writing process. All of us are capable of intellectual and imaginative things and WIM is offering a variety of workshops to help you to express your creativity.

You may register for workshops by calling Jean Stone at  607-326-4802 or emailing her to jtstone@catskill.net, or by filling out the online registration form. Full and partial scholarships are available, according to need. Go to Register Online page for more information.

Fees:

for six-week workshops

$60 — if you register and prepay for any class up to three weeks before the class begins.
$75 — after that.

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2014 Schedule

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0-1WINTER JOURNALING
with Geoff Rogers

January 7 – February 11

This is a class for the novice and veteran journal keeper alike. Participants will write weekly, read their work aloud in class, listen to and then discuss the work of others. We will also examine the process of writing, looking for ways to improve our understanding of the craft.

Tuesdays, (six sessions)
10 am – noon, Fairview Public Library, Margaretville, NY
$60/ 75

Register

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CREATIVE NON-FICTION with Anique Taylor

February 13 – March 20

Bring the compelling and dramatic to your personal stories, essays, memoirs with the study of craft techniques of poetry, fiction and playwriting. Join us in a journey into mood, metaphor, viewpoint, dialogue and tone. Explore memory, risk, danger, dreams, your own version of reality or the perceived truth of the real world around you. We’ll combine free-writing, class exercises, short assignments, supportive class feedback and the study of non-fiction work by famous authors to hone and deepen the art of your Creative Nonfiction.

Thursdays, (six sessions)
11 am – 1 pm, Pine Hill Community Center, Pine Hill, NY
$60/ 75

Register

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MAPPING YOUR WILD MIND
with Ellen Stewart

May 20 – June 24

Maps are tools, compasses by which we navigate. Maps orient you, letting you know where you are in the world in relationship to your surroundings, where you are in your life, where you are in a plot line, or where you are in your imagination. Challenge yourself to explore the creative process by creating and exploring the map of your Wild Mind. Find your creative rhythmand voice by using your senses in the process. The Wild Mind emphasizes process over product, and is open to any ability level from beginning to experienced writers.  By exposing yourself to visual images, tactile media, form and color, you will enhance and enliven your writing. Wild Mind is taught by a licensed Art Therapist and author of two books, Ellen Greene-Stewart. Offered by WIM for the past dozen years, this is the class that keeps evolving and just won’t quit. Warning:  this class is not for the faint of heart. Bring your enthusiasm and creative juices (and a smidgen of trepidation) on this exciting voyage of discovery. No prior art or writing experience is necessary.

Tuesdays, (six sessions)
6 – 8 pm, Roxbury Public Library, Roxbury, NY
$60/75

Register

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THE SIGNIFICANCE OF STORY
with Carol Little

April 7- May 12

Every person’s story is unique. Stories have personal meaning, turning points and markers. As we remember and write, or write and remember, we bring together parts of ourselves that may have been scattered, distorted or hidden.

“The events in our lives happen in a sequence in time, but in their significance to ourselves, they find their own order… the continuous thread of revelation,” Eudora Welty.

Mondays, (six sessions)
6 – 8 pm, Andes Public Library, Andes, NY
$60/75

Register

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lesliesharpeSEEING NATURE IN WORDS
with Leslie Sharpe

May 10 – June 15 (skipping Memorial Day)

Whether one is writing to change the world, or for the simple pleasure of recording one’s  observations in a notebook, the relationship between the observer and nature is at its core, always personal, and intensely felt. It is this passion that has made this form so dynamic and also so accessible, to read and to write. The goal of “Seeing Nature in Words: A Nature Writing Workshop” is to encourage writers to explore their own special relationship with the natural world—whether  that relationship is to the Catskill High Peaks or a backyard garden, expressed as a description of a single flower or as an essay probing an environmental issue—in their own true voice.

Writers will be asked to write up to 1,000 words, which translates into approximately 4 pages, double-spaced, TNR, 12 pt., every week. Journaling, or for that matter blogging, as in recording impressions in a naturalist’s notebook, is fine, and we will work to sharpen the writer’s eye and descriptive details.  But if a writer aspires to write a finished personal essay, perhaps even for submission, with fully developed subject and theme, we will support that too.

My approach, as an editor, as well as a writing teacher, is to find what works in the writing and to build on that. And that approach is rooted in my respect for every writer, and their work. What is especially important for writers is a workshop environment that allows them to feel safe—safe to express themselves, their thoughts and feelings, as well as observations—especially when working in those creative nonfiction forms (journaling, personal essay, memoir) that use the first person “I” voice, and that speak directly out of one’s personal experience.

Saturdays, (six sessions)
11 am – 1 pm, Delaware County Historical Association, Delhi, NY
$60/75

Register

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POETRY
with Lynn Domina

June 2 – July 7

The Daily News: A Poetry Workshop

What do you look at first? The police blotter? The obituaries? Your horoscope? In this workshop, we’ll use the organization of a newspaper as inspiration for our poems. Each week, we’ll focus on a different type of article—commentary, advice column, sports, classified ads, etc.—to inspire our work. And all the while, we’ll keep it poetic by elements of craft such as figurative language, imagery, rhythm, and other challenges poets lose sleep over.

Mondays, (six sessions) 
6 – 8 pm, Andes Public Library, Andes, NY

$60/75

Register

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BarbaraAtCRITICS CORNER
with Barbara Apoian

June 19 – July 24

This “Writers Choice” edition of Critics Corner will permit writers to bring new pieces, works-in-progress, or earlier work they feel needs some changes and a fresh approach. Each piece will be carefully reviewed by the group, under Barbara’s guidance, and changes suggested to enhance the work.

In addition, class members will be required to submit at least two short pieces in response to “themes” and “subjects” suggested at the beginning of the workshop, demonstrating the wide variety of ideas stimulated by a common source. Everyone has a different idea – the subject may be the same but the events are always surprisingly different. A variety of suggested subjects will be available for “blocked” writers seeking new ideas and settings who would like to work on new pieces during the length of the six-week sessions.

Thursdays, (six sessions) 
6 – 8 pm, Roxbury Run Village Clubhouse, Denver, NY
$60/75

Register

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Leah SchiffJOURNALING
with Leah Schiff

July 8 – August 12

As Geoff Rogers once said “Writing memories allows us to improve the ability to focus scattered thoughts, focus our own feeling at the moment, and put our memories into coherent written passages.” Writing memories is a journey into self-discovery, addressing anxieties, healing emotional damage, or just ranting at an unjust done to you or to the world. Once you write, and your thoughts are on paper, you may feel relieved and light. Come, share with us.  

Tuesdays, (six sessions)
10 am – noon, Pine Hill Community Center, Pine Hill, NY

$60/75 

Register

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PERSONAL ESSAY
with Barbara Apoian

July 31 – September 4 

Personal Essays can express opinions about some of the decisions you have made and now regret and would like to change.  They open up a new freedom in your writing so you can say how you feel about your life and today’s world and let your imagination carry you to wished-for experience.  A personal essay is a narrative in which the writer describes an experience that provided significant personal meaning, or it is a personal opinion about a topic or issue that is important to the writer.  It is based on feeling, emotion, opinion, and life experience.  It is autobiographical. 

Thursdays, six sessions

10 am – noon, Fairview Public Library, Margaretville, NY
$60/75

Register

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IN CarolLittle2THE MIDST OF WINTER: WRITING ABOUT YOUR DEAD PEOPLE
With Carol Little

September 22 – October 27

I think of my loved ones who have died as my dead people.  Unlike stories of the aftermath of disasters that affect a large segment of society, there is little ongoing opportunity to speak of the private aftermath of having a dead person in one’s midst. The dead too soon disappear from all but a few conversations.

There are many reasons to write about our dead—to preserve memories, to make sense of our experiences, to reveal the impact of loss on our lives.  Anna Quindlen, columnist and author, wrote, “We are defined by who we have lost.”

Textbooks and pamphlets on death and bereavement attempt to define a process that is unique to each individual. The attempts fail as a “one path fits all” approach emerges. However, In The Midst of Winter: Selections from the Literature of Mourning (1982), it is the written expressions of varied personal experiences that evoke emotional connections between one human and another, between the events and the writers, between the living and the dead. Dozens of writers are included in this book, including Mark Twain, Shakespeare, Robert Frost, Stanley Kunitz, C.S. Lewis, Virginia Woolf and Emily Dickinson.

In this class participants will read from the literature of mourning, and write personal experiences related to deaths—close or distant—new or old.

 Mondays, six sessions

6-8pm, Andes Public Library, Andes, NY
$60/75

Register

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THE NEWS OF POETRY

with Andrew Tully Andrew Tully

September 6 – October 11 

Students will be introduced  to various poetic forms school and styles, such as the sonnet, sestina, haiku, Surrealists & Automatic Writing, the Beats, etc.  We will consider ancient, apocalyptic, modern, post modern and contemporary poems and poets. Each week, a list of writing prompts will be distributed to inspire new poems. Students’ poetry will be read in class, focusing on the participants’ work, offering critiques and constructive criticism to each member’s poem.  The goal is to produce one to two poems per week

Saturdays, six sessions

3-5pm, Fairview Public Library, Margaretville, NY
$60/75

Register
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WHERE DOES A PLAY COME FROM?  AND WHERE CAN IT GO?  

with Amie Brockway                                                                 Amie Brockway

September 8 – October 20 (skipping Columbus Day)

In this class we will explore first impulses for writing a play, and the creative process from page to stage.  We will look at specific examples found in selected short plays, and in excerpts from longer works.  We will discover and examine our own creative impulses and see where they lead. There will be time for reading, listening, discussing, and writing in each class.  Students will be encouraged to begin and complete a short play or monologue over the course of the six sessions, or to continue with a longer work already begun.  We’ll look at opportunities for a finished play — locally, regionally, and nationally.  This class is suitable for beginning and experienced playwrights.

Mondays, (six sessions) 
6 – 8 pm, The Open Eye Theater, Margaretville, NY   
$60/$75
 
Register
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CREATIVE NON-FICTION 

with Anique Taylor 

September 4, 2014 – January 15, 2015

In a college-like semester packed with excitement and growth, this extended class will offer writers possibilities for deepening their craft, group support and continuing work on long projects. With a preference for exploring memory, risk, danger, dreams, different versions of reality and deeper connection with self, the class will explore personal essay, memoir, journal work, writing for ourselves and for publication.

Class exercises will familiarize students with techniques of poetry, fiction, playwriting to provide tools to hone their work. Classes will include free-writing, exploratory exercises, supportive feedback on students’ writing, along with discussions on short works by famous authors (nonfiction essays, stories and memoir along with essays on craft and the writer’s life). Between classes, reading and work suggestions will be offered for those interested.
All welcome, students with long projects, short projects or those who want to take it week by week. All levels welcome.
Thursdays, (sixteen sessions) 

11 am – 1 pm, Pine Hill Community Center, Pine Hill, NY

$200

Register

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